Thursday, September 15, 2022

Hearts A Busting/"The Lord's My Shepherd" -Jessie Irvine

 

Recently, I felt so "homesick" for London that I wrote down the names of the bridges that I know that cross the Thames....

Tower Bridge, London Bridge, Southwark Bridge, Blackfriars, Waterloo, Hungerford, Westminster, Lambeth, Vauxhall.  There, I think those are in the correct order.... I am walking across them in my mind.

 I find myself looking at that list as I see the lines (queues) alongside the Thames of all the people making their way to pay their last respects to the Queen.  So many! And it is heartwarming to hear how a great many of them have made friends with each other. At the same time here in Georgia, in the USA, our native plant, Euonymus americanus, has gone to seed.  It is most perfectly called "Hearts a busting" and I am happy to say that we now have several in our own garden.   So, "hearts a busting"...that seems appropriate to think of how many might be feeling regarding the passing of Queen Elizabeth.  Sad but also very thankful for her life, with full hearts that feel as though they could burst.  

At the Memorial service for the Queen in Edinburgh they played the hymn "The Lord's My Shepherd" with the tune of "Crimond" being used.  I wondered about that tune and so I looked it up.  (The same hymn with that same tune was performed at the wedding of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip by the way.) Crimond is a village in Aberdeenshire, Scotland and the tune was written by the teenaged daughter of the vicar from the church in that town in 1871.  Her name was Jessie Seymour Irvine.  You might see the hymn in some places with the composer of the melody listed as David Grant.  It seems that Jessie Irvine had asked him to work on a portion of the tune (to reharmonize it for her) and somehow, his name was listed as the sole composer.  Jessie Seymour Irvine died in 1887.  It wasn't until the 1940's that letters emerged showing that she had indeed written the tune and David Grant had only provided the harmony. There is still some controversy regarding this.  I am in the Jessie Seymour Irvine camp!

Also, if you look up any info about the church in Crimond, you may see they have a clock that has an extra minute with the inscription, "The hour's coming". Oh! And they also have a fish shaped weather vane!


Now, I am sure that this same hymn, "The Lord's My Shepherd" will be played for the funeral of Queen Elizabeth on Monday.  When you hear it, you will remember that the tune was written by a young Scottish woman, Jessie Seymour Irvine.  (David Grant did the harmony!)



Hopefully, you can hear the video that I have here for you!

NOTE:  There is a hymn at the beginning of the TV show "The Vicar of Dibley".  That is also the 23rd Psalm but it is sung to a different tune.









22 comments:

  1. What an interesting flower! Wonder if they'll grow in Kansas. Do birds want to eat them, as they look like raspberries. Linda in Kansas

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    1. It does look like a flower but they are really very colorful seeds. The first time I saw it, it stopped me in my tracks, I am not kidding! The birds DO like to eat them! The cardinals are eating the seeds off the bushes in my back yard just as I am typing this to you. They are saying hello to you in Kansas, just as I do! They are native to the southeast but I am sure you can look them up to see if you have them there also. x

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  2. Thank you for sharing Crimond, in memory of Her Majesty. I have never heard about Jessie Irvine; what an amazing composition for a teenager. The harmony by David Grant is superb. I have sung Crimond all my life, with many different choirs, in church, at weddings and funerals, and in concerts. And with the passing of the years, I have sung Also, Soprano and the lovely descant part when I was young and well-rehearsed. Great post.

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    1. I love that you are so familiar with this lovely tune and yet, I am able to tell you about Jessie Irvine! Don't you wish that we knew more about her life? Maybe someone will make a film about her one day! I do hope that you will do a post about the Queen and her memorial services. I love your blog! xx

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  3. I seem to remember that you have shown us this particular flower before. It certainly fits the theme!
    Interesting (as always) about the tune and its composer(s). Typical, too, that the man was considered the composer and the young woman overlooked. Women often chose to publish works of art (literature, poetry, music…) under male pen names because they would not have been taken seriously if people knew the authors were women.
    We heard about those long queues on the news. To be honest, much as I appreciate the historicalness of this moment in time, I doubt that I would join the queue if I happened to be in London right now.

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    1. Oh yes, I have shown you the "hearts a busting" plant with the colorful seeds. I look for them every year but THIS year is the first time that I have had them in my very own backyard!!
      I do wonder how the man's name ended up as being the sole composer...there must be a book in there for someone to research and to write! As for those long lines or queues as they say in England, you can bet that had I been in England, I would certainly have stood there for whatever time was needed, hand on my English heart, I would have!

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  4. A man taking credit for a woman's work? Why am I not surprised.

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    1. I know, right? And it does make me wonder...couldn't any of her family correct the mistake -assuming this was done after her death, I mean. Ah well, it also makes you think, how many other things were done and men got the credit?

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  5. I think hearts are a busting all around the world. She was love and admired by all. Love, ma

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    1. You know, it was amazing to see the response from everyone. I don't care what anyone says about the monarchy, the Queen was a great lady.

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  6. I was only 5 years old when Elizabeth became Queen so she is the only British monarch I remember. She always carried herself with such dignity. At the same time she was so human. It is a loss to the world.

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  7. I was three years old when Elizabeth became Queen. It feels strange to think she's gone. It puts a different feel to our trip to England next spring. I'm looking forward to going up on the Tower Bridge.

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    1. I wonder if you saw the photo of Tower Bridge all lit up in purple lights in honor of the Queen! If not, look it up!

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  8. Many hearts are full of much sadness over the loss of the Queen, including mine.

    Thank you so much for the information you provide on music, it's always nice to learn more about music.

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    1. I drive myself crazy looking stuff up, whether it's about music, architecture, flowers, trees, films, books...the list goes on and on.

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  9. The proper tune for Psalm 23. Well done.

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    1. Did you notice that the 2nd hymn at the Queen's funeral was the very same hymn that I wrote about here? AND that it even said on the TV screen as the hymn began, "The Lord's My Shepherd - Jessie Irvine".
      That pleased me very much.

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  10. She became Queen the year I was born. She was interesting, dignified, gracious, intelligent, and hard working. A tower of strength for her country and her people. Thanks for the info on the hymn and the song was beautiful.

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    1. A tower of strength...that is a good description. Happy you like the hymn too.

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  11. I may be in Texas but she'll always be my Queen! I'm 71 so she's all I've ever known...She will be greatly missed! She brought people together...I worry that Charles won't be like his mother...
    hughugs
    Donna

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    1. She met so many U S presidents but she didn't get to meet LBJ. Don't you know she would have loved Lady Bird? Take care! Hugs to you.

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