Saturday, June 24, 2017

Who Is Henry Bates? "A Rare Human Being"- Amazon Adventure IMAX Film






The IMAX film, "Amazon Adventure"  is based on the true story of the 11 year journey down the Amazon by the Englishman Henry Bates in 1848. (At the time, it was only small sailing vessels that were used...steamships came a bit later!)  The book that he wrote of his discoveries, "The Naturalist on the River Amazons" was published in 1863 and he was encouraged to write of his experiences by Charles Darwin.  The subtitle of the book is from a time when books had subtitles that told you quite simply what was in store for you:  It is: A Record of the Adventures, Habits of Animals, Sketches of Brazilian and Indian Life, and Aspects of Nature under the Equator during Eleven Years of Travel. 

Also, please note that the book has the word "Amazon" in the plural as I have it spelled above! Was the river called Amazons in those days?  And in England, the word "Amazon" is pronounced "Ama-zun" while in America, we say "Ama-ZAHN".   You will notice this if you watch the next YouTube clip I have for you...



I just looked this up and it is being shown at the IMAX Theatre at the Fernbank Museum of Natural History in Atlanta until the end of September, 2017.  It must be at all IMAX theatres all over the country, check it out!




Even if you don't see the movie, read about Henry Walter Bates and his amazing life.  I have a link for you here and here!  Besides being a naturalist and explorer, he was also a singer and guitarist and you know that makes him special to me!

On a personal note, Richard and I walked past Burlington House once when we were in London and it looked so inviting, we just had to stop there and have a coffee in the courtyard. Read the links about Henry Bates and you will then know about Burlington House and the Linnean Society!

You never know who will be lurking in the shadows of these mighty gates!

29 comments:

  1. My goodness. You have included a bit of history, a bit of science, a bit of geography, and a bit of architecture. Then to top it all off you add a bit of music. Fantastic post.

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    1. Thank you, Emma! A bit of this and that, that's me! :-)

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  2. VERY interesting and a great photo of you!

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    1. Ha, ha...this was from a few years back now so I have made myself younger!

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  3. Bates sounds like someone i would have liked to know.

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    1. I know! Doesn't he sound fascinating? Largely self taught too, makes me like him all the more.

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  4. I have not heard of Henry Bates, but he was obviously quite the talented explorer. Will look out for this movie as I am sure I'd enjoy it and learn a lot. Cute photo of you and a phone box :)

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    1. That year in London, I made sure to pose with every red phone box I could find, I will always love them.

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  5. I'm not much of a movie goer, but interesting.
    I love the butterfly photo.

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    1. Thanks! Richard took that one, of course!

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  6. I confess to not having heard of Henry Bates until now. The movie looks fascinating - I'll keep an eye open for it. Loved your shot of the London Lurker!

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    1. The London Lurker...ha, ha, that sounds like something from one of the crime shows from England!
      I am happy to introduce you to Henry Bates!

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  7. Those IMAX shows always make you feel like you are right there and I imagine this one will be exciting. I always enjoy of bit of history and love the pictures today. That butterfly is just brilliant! Thanks always for sharing.

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    1. History was always my favorite in school, I used to drive my teachers crazy wanting to know more details!
      I thought the photo of the butterfly went well with the subject, Henry Bates discovered thousands of butterflies and had one even named after him!

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  8. Good photographs. Henry Bates sounds like an awesome guy..

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    1. Thank you, Treey!
      My husband took the photos, I think he is very good!
      I see from your blog that you are also a musician, having once played in a band. I take my hat off to you!

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  9. I think back then, it was not uncommon to call the Amazon river "the Amazons", as it is so widespread a water body that it can easily count as more than one river.
    By the way, in your last picture I could not help but spot two things: your "fruity" bag, and the shop on the other side of the road! My sister introduced me to Cath Kidston shops when she first went to England with me, she has numerous handbags and other items from the brand, and give me one which is one of my favourite and most often used handbags (with a colourful print of little squirrels on them). My keyring is Cath Kidston, too (gift from my sister-in-law) and so is my cosmetics bag which I use every weekend when I travel to O.K.'s :-)

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    1. Amazons in the plural makes sense to me but I wanted to make sure that folks knew I had not misspelled it but that was the correct word in those days! :-)
      Well spotted on the Cath Kidston shop! Now when you get to London, you will know it is across from Burlington House! (Go there and pose in the same spot as I did, that would be funny!)
      I went into the Cath Kidston shop at the London/Heathrow airport. I love all of her things but a bit on the pricey side for me! Love the red/aqua combo of colors used on the sign.

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  10. I didn't realise you guys pronounced Amazon differently. I've seen plenty of American TV shows but I've just never noticed. It was incredible Henry Bates was able to survive and survey the Amazon across 11 years. I imagine the scientific community must have been greatly boosted by his work.

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    1. Stick with me, Mark and I will tell you every different way possible that Americans can change the English language! Aren't you glad to know about Henry Bates? He seems fascinating to me!

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  11. I live fairly close to Fernbank - I have meant to see that IMAX film. Thanks for the reminder!

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    1. Hey Lynn! Lucky you to live so close to Fernbank! Richard and I once walked on the trails there and we were surprised by a strong thunderstorm...we arrived back at Fernbank soaking wet, looking as if we had just come from the Amazon Forests! HA!
      Let me know if you see this film and what you think of it!

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  12. Not heard of Bates or the film until now. I'll look out for it if it comes here.

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    1. Let me know if you hear anything about it! Hope the hot weather over there didn't bother your long walks!

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  13. Is that you lurking in the last shot? So cute! :D

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    1. Yes that is me, I only like my photos taken if they are very far away or if I am in deep shadow! Trust me, it is for the best! :-)

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  14. A wonderful post Kay! I am going to look for the movie at our local IMAX which is at the Air and Space Museum only 20 minutes up the road. Great photos and a lovely one of you near the telephone box.

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    1. Hey Denise! Thank you! I love would to know if you get to see this film, it would tickle me no end!
      My husband takes great photos even if I mess one up now and then by being in one! :-)

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  15. You were waiting for Superman, I know!! Did he turn-up? I hope you looked away when he changed! :)

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