Thursday, August 10, 2017

An Algorithm For Natural Beauty?





For anyone who reads my blog, you should know that I like to read the BBC online. Recently, I was surprised to read a story about beauty... you may read it yourself just here.  Now, for those of you who can't be bothered to click on that link, I will tell you anyway! (Also, I have a thing to say about the electronic music used on it...it is dreadful!) Researchers at the University of Warwick have developed an algorithm to rate images from one to 10 for natural beauty. This will supposedly be helpful in the preservation of places of beauty.   Okay, that is fair enough...but all of that work and bother when honestly, there is a much SIMPLER way to know...they should have called me!  You know I would tell them, right?


Years ago, I read that the most successful blogs have a "theme" and for those that are lacking a central focus, they are doomed to failure.   Oh dear, I thought, my little blog will be a dud.   I asked my son what would he say my blog was all about.  His reply was prompt: "That's easy, Mom.  You search for beauty."  

Who needs an algorithm for determining scenic beauty?
Not me!










27 comments:

  1. The only way to measure beauty is when a person looks at something and has a good feeling about it. What is beautiful to one may not be quite so much to another.

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    1. There should be a common standard that everyone should agree on, even those without good taste, like me! HA!

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  2. You probably do not know my old post "Beauty, Unexpected" (from 2009); you may read it here.
    Your blog has become very popular very fast - you are definitely doing something right there, dear Kay :-)
    Breaking the world down into algorithm to me seems a poor approach. What about delightful randomness?

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    1. No, I didn't know your post but I read it this morning and I really liked it and I totally agree! I should have told you in this post...this week at work, I spotted the first red maple leave in the parking lot at work. That doesn't sound like much, but that bright red against the black asphalt was indeed a beautiful sight. How many would walk past that and not think a thing about it? All of my co-workers, that's who! Beauty in unexpected places is very welcome to me.

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  3. Hi Kay - I recognise some carpet gardens ... well soaked at the moment. Beauty is what we make of it ... love all views and all ideas ... I'd rather be unique in the world, than follow the crowds ... cheers and enjoy the weekend - Hilary

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    1. YES! Those are the Carpet Gardens indeed! AND I think that the gorgeous Victorian buildings in Eastbourne should also be considered scenic beauty and everyone should think so!
      I never follow the crowd and refuse to go along with all the trends these days just to be fashionable. I am sure that people think me weird but I don't care! :-)

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  4. I always like your photos from your walks. Searching for beauty is always a good thing.

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    1. Thanks, Lynn! You will recognize me climbing up Stone Mountain, I am sure! :-)

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  5. Not too sure about a beauty scale for nature. Many places I explored as a child were extremely beautiful(to my young eyes) yet were just a small local gorge, a wood in a valley hollow, or a secret unexpected waterfall in a little patch of trees hiding a large cliff- would they make the list as worth saving? Probably not.

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    1. Just recently, I was struck by the beauty of the bright green moss on our walk at Panola Mountain...I doubt that would get past that algorithm!

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  6. As much as I love science, there are times I think that scientists just get bored and need something to do. Who actually creates an algorithm for determining natural beauty? If people feel that something is beautiful and should be preserved, then it should. You don't need robots for everything.

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    1. Ah, if only the world would listen to your wisdom...You don't need robots for everything. HEAR HEAR!

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  7. This makes me think: Beauty is everywhere !

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    1. Beauty is everywhere...for those with the eyes to see it.

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  8. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, not in the eye of the computer!

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  9. I think I learn something new everytime I come here! I do think we should try to preserve as many things as we can-but--that being said, what is beautiful to me is not always beautiful to someone else and vice-versa.

    I hope YOU have a BEAUTIFUL weekend! xo Diana

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    1. You should know the different views on beauty...think of your posts with the choices you have on the beautifully laid tables! (I think they are all pretty, I like to think which one would be the best COLOR for me!)
      Hope YOU have a great weekend, dear Diana! xx

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  10. I don't know if my blog has a theme or not...and I really don't care much, one way or the other.

    I write what I feel like writing at the time of writing. That's my theme... :)

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    1. I must have the same theme, Lee! You have such lively posts, they are always so interesting and you even give us recipes to drool over!

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  11. That makes sense. I don't know what my theme would be. It's my sermons. I ask, in preparation: God, what strange that you want explained, what do you want from us, what are you promising us to make your calling possible.

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    1. The very first blog that I knew was from the King of Peace Episcopal Church in Kingsland, GA. I was looking up info on how to make a Jesse tree for our Sunday school class for my son and I found that blog. Then, I went on a journey of all the blogs I could find, and then, became interested in church sites that would publish their sermons. I have fond memories of Raspberry Rabbit...he was a very funny vicar in a church in Scotland!
      Your sermons are very good, you should think of having them published in a book, I think.

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  12. I usually write about things that happen in my life, past and present. I try to avoid politics and religion.

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    1. I think most people that read my blog don't like to stir the waters too much, especially in regards to politics.

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  13. I was going to say two things: beauty is in the eye of the beholder (messymimi beat me to it and I love her continuation - which I would not have thought of saying); and secondly that the research is fundamentally flawed because it makes an assumption that beauty is synonymous with the countryside. If you eliminated the countryside and asked about beauty showing pictures of different cities or parts thereof the response would have been totally different.

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    1. PS The algorith was to determine natural beauty so showing city-scapes was pointless anyway. I possibly did my response too hastily after having gone to Meike's blog and then the article too.

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    2. Hey Graham!
      I really meant to write a bit more on this post that beauty is not just in natural beauty but can also apply to architecture. That is why I chose the photo of the beautiful Victorian buildings beside the Carpet Gardens in Eastbourne! By the time I wrote this post, I couldn't get my thoughts together very well. I only just thought of my sweet son telling me my theme for my blog and I put that on here, and it sounds like I am an expert on beauty when in fact, I am not an expert on anything, which you know already. Still have my sense of humor though, that counts for a lot.

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