Monday, October 22, 2012

Colors At Stone Mountain

 
Beautiful colors at Stone Mountain but not leaf changing color, not just yet, but soon, very soon. Just recently, we were walking down the path to the carving at the front of Stone Mountain and I looked down and saw red berries beneath my feet.  I looked up and I saw this:

 


 
Those red berries against that blue sky! It was breathtaking! I wonder how many people walked underneath this beauty and never saw it.   If you notice petals or berries at your feet, please remember to LOOK UP, you just don't know what you might miss.  This is a pyracantha.  I have one with orange berries but I must say that I would love to have this red one.
 
Another beautiful bush that I think a lot of people might miss at Stone Mountain has the wonderful name of Beautyberry.  Wonder what it might look like?  Wonder no more, here it is!  Can you see the ladybugs?  I didn't until I saw this on my computer!  This bush is at the top of Stone Mountain and is right in front of the building for the sky-lifts and people just walked right past this without a glance, but you know this Georgia Girl didn't!  By the way, I took the close-up photos of both of these plants!
 
There are always visitors from all over the world on top of Stone Mountain.  I found that someone had written this in black marker and while I don't approve of people defacing the mountain, I did wonder what this said...could anyone translate for me? I hope that it is a nice thought and nothing that would offend anyone!
The leaves were just turning on these trees near the Grist Mill at the lake which is just beside the Cherokee Trail.   
 
We did make it to the top of Stone Mountain! That's Richard looking out over the mountain, and that's me in my pink shirt, again!
Hope y'all are enjoying all the colors of this season, wherever you are in the world!

49 comments:

  1. So much sunshine and colour. Beautiful. I have a beautyberry in my garden growing up above a Californian lilac, I will now think of this as the USA tribute corner of the garden :-)

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    1. Hello Wendy!
      Thanks so much for your comment from the Wendy House!
      Wonderful. Now, I will think of Wendy when I see the beautyberry again! I like the idea of the USA tribute corner, be sure to giggle when you gaze upon it, and that will make you think of me! :-)

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  2. Great pictures - as usual :-) Love the berries and the picture with the mill!
    As for the French inscription on the rock, my French is quite rusty, but I think I can more or less work out what it says:
    The sun gives a "something" to the eye (sorry, never heard of a French term "cling"); tell me, comrade Sun, isn't it really more stupid to give a similar day to a...?
    (Patron can mean many things; most of the time, it refers to the boss at work, but it can also mean a patron saint. The whole inscription sounds a bit like it is supposed to be a piece of modern poetry. And "con" actually can mean a really nasty word which I am not going to write down here.)

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    1. Thanks, Meike! I knew you could tell me. C. and I thought that the word you mentioned, looks as if it was written in later, by a different hand. This reminds me of something from the Bible, from the Book of Matthew... "That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust."
      Perhaps whoever wrote this really did feel that his bad boss did not deserve such a sunny day! :-)

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  3. The mill looks a bit ramshackle but must have been there for many years. Great colourful tour.

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    1. It is over one hundred years old and was moved in 1965 from Ellijay, Georgia. You would not believe how much photographers use this as a backdrop. In Georgia, buildings like this are very precious since so many have been torn down.

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  4. Always so much to see on your walks, Kay. You're a lucky girl. Lovely photos - I love ladybirds and always make a wish when I see one.

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    1. Thanks, and I wonder if you could tell me why we say ladybugs in America but it is ladybirds in England? Either way, I have always loved to see them.

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  5. Beautiful photos, Kay. I especially love the Grist Mill ! I enjoy photographing things like that; they are exceptional sights. And what a fitting name for the Beautyberry. It's simply lovely.

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    1. Thanks, Martha. The Grist Mill is photographed so much. Often, there are couples all dressed up with a photographer in tow, I think for them to be photographed for their engagement photo, no doubt.
      And I just bought myself a beautyberry, and then was told that they are very easy to root, HA, just like me!

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  6. Not always a whole lot of color here besides green and brown, but i do love your beautyberries!

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    1. We haven't had too much color yet either, but we will!
      Do you have much leaf change color where you are? We didn't when we lived in South Georgia, if I remember correctly.

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  7. Loved the mill, hate people who scrawl their witless thoughts for all to see.

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    1. I know, I hate graffiti too. I am hoping that the bright, bright sun will fade those letters away in a very short time. Le soleil, indeed! :-)

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  8. What beautiful, beautiful pictures (except that silly defacing!).

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    1. Thanks, Janice. It's hard to believe how people will take away from beauty like this, we even saw a woman picking the yellow daisies and we saw another one breaking branches off a pine tree. Why? Who knows?

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  9. Hi Kay! Yes, that is probably my second favorite header photo yet. (I still love the one from England with the red bus!) Anyhoo, I could die because these pictures are so gorgeous. Look at that Beautyberry photo ~ it's so vibrant. Perked up my midday ~ thank you!

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    1. Hey Audrey!
      Oh, I am glad you like it and oddly enough, I started to put the red bus back on there! Telepathic thoughts!
      Glad you like the beautyberry and with a ladybug too!

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  10. Regarding the French on the rock: roughly translated it says:

    He gives the sun a wink, saying, so then, friend sun, isn't it damned stupid to give the same day to a boss

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    1. Thanks, Carol, for telling me this. That seems a strange thought to me, I wonder why anyone would begrudge the view from Stone Mountain to anyone. It is a truly beautiful sight.
      Thanks again for your translation. ;-) There, I made a face with a wink for you!

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    2. No, Kay, the writer does not begrudge the view from the mountain. On the contrary, he enjoys it so much that he says to the sun it would be stupid to be spending such a beautiful sunny day at work (= giving the day to a boss).

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    3. Oh, thanks, Meike. that makes so much more sense to me. And just wondering, did you know that I love the French language, I do! Sometimes, if I watch a French movie, I don't always have to read the sub-titles, I can understand a good bit of it!

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    4. Well, Kay, now you know why it's so hard to translate stuff -- like literature! :0) Did the best I could, but as it seems I was wrong, I apologize. It wasn't my intention to mislead yuo! Hugs!

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    5. Oh no, Carol, no need to apologize! I appreciate your comment here very much. If you go back and read what you wrote and then what Meike has written, it really says the same thing, you just have to know the meaning behind "giving the same day to the boss". It must lose something in the translation, as they say!
      Thanks again! :-)

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    6. Thanks, Kay, you're very kind. I used to take French classes every week, and if I were still attending, I would've taken the quote in and had my teacher check it, to make sure I got it right. As it was I used my limited knowledge and my French books to puzzle out the meaning. But if I learned one thing in French class, it's that the French language is a mine field of idioms and colloquialisms, and it's easy to go off the rails and get the wrong meaning out of the phrases! I'm glad you've forgiven me. :o)

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    7. Isn't that what makes languages so interesting? The MEANING behind something might be very different from what the literal translation is, and I do love the French language, I really do. I really dislike graffiti, but I could not resist taking this photo from the top of Stone Mountain, simply because it was in French! Thanks so much for taking the time to help in this, I really do appreciate it!

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  11. Those berries are beautiful, and I really like the old mill.

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    1. Thanks,Terry and the Grist Mill is really beautiful, beside the lake and under the trees, it is in a nice spot.

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  12. Oh, what a gorgeous post. Those berries are unbelievable, and the mill looks like something out of a storybook.

    What a very French message that is! (In terms of cynicism I mean.) I like your comparison with the verse from Matthew.

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    1. Thank you so much, Sue! I'm glad you liked the verse from Matthew too. I am surprised how much of the Bible is in my head, but I still have to look things up to get them exactly right!

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  13. One day you'll have to write a book about Stone mountain. Lovely photos as usual. The message is a nice one, but I'll leave it to a French person to give you an exact translation. (and it has a spelling mistake in it - no g in "clin") :)

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    1. Dear Jenny,
      That's funny, my son could translate most of this, but he also said he had never heard the word "cling" as a French word!
      Do you think that I could write a book about Stone Mountain? Maybe Arabia Mountain too? Who knows, I didn't think I could write a blog either and look how many posts just keep rollling along! I do think Richard's photos would be nice in a book!
      And I am still looking for YOUR book about the Victorians!

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  14. I love both the red and purple berries against the October-blue sky. I, too, have the orange-berried pyracantha, but have longed for the red. The birds do love our orange berries, though! I would really love to have a beautyberry.

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    1. Glad you like these colors too!
      I have been told that beautyberry is very easy to root. I don't know this for sure, but it is worth asking for a branch to root if you know anyone who has one!

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  15. What a beautiful place! The colors of the berries against the sky are just outstanding!

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    1. I am grateful that I didn't miss this color!
      Now, looking for some autumn leaves color!

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  16. I envy your color yet to come...ours is already done. Most of the leaves have fallen. It's been a beautiful fall though and I think yours is looking amazing too! I love the pics of the berries. The purple ones don't even look real...so lovely. Glad you were able to spy them and share them with us!

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    1. "Color yet to come", I like that! Glad you liked this color too. :-)

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  17. at first i thought that first picture spelled a real word. as it is, it still seems to be spelling something. i love it. :^)

    stone mountain is very beautiful. thanks for the berry fine walk along. i loved it too.

    xoxo
    kj

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    1. "A berry fine walk", where are you when I am thinking of title posts? :-)
      So happy you enjoyed this colorful walk with us!

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  18. These are lovely photos depicting various colors! Beautiful Ms Kay! :)

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    1. Thank you! I think I am "in love with beautyberry"!

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  19. Super shots, Kay, and I loved the various efforts at translation. Clin d'oiel is a wink - I don't know where the letter g came from!

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    1. John,
      Thank you!
      Yes, I appreciated those who know French better than I do. Carol, Meike and Jenny, thank you very much!
      Good to know that people can misspell words all over the world. :-)

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  20. Thank you for those lovely pictures of the berries against a blue sky. I have a pyracanta too but it is struggling a bit - too far north and too close to the sea for them to really grow well - but I try!

    I do so enjoy my "walks" with you.

    Pat

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    1. My pyracantha stuggles too, my backyard is a bit too shady, but the birds still like it.
      And you know I thought of you when I did this post! Hope to go back to Stone Mountain very soon, look out for it!

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  21. Pyracanta - I meant Pyracantha Ooooppps! There it goes again. Don't you just hate it when you hit the send button and at that split second see that you have a spelling mistake. Such is life! Pat

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    1. HA HA, I do that all the time!! C'est la vie!

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  22. I always try and remember to look up and out! That perspective always adds something new!

    e

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